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Pomades, Waxes and Hair Pastes

Knowing the Difference Between a Pomade, Hair Wax and a Paste

Every where you look, in your favorite fashion magazine, daytime drama or the Pinterest hair boards, short hair is everywhere. Cute pixie haircuts to messy shags, shorter styles are in and are here to stay. Every woman I know that has sat in her hair stylist’s chair and said “Let’s go for it!” and chopped off her lovely locks has adored her new found style. Until that is, until it came time to style her hair.

If a proper consultation was not preformed while you were sitting in the chair. By consultation I mean that you were not taught how to style your new ‘do nor told what products would work best, worry not. We’ve got you covered on the products that work best for styling your new short haircut.

Hair Wax

Hair Wax

In the past, hair waxes had more of a watery consistency, now you will find many waxes are a creamier consistency, which means it usually offers a firmer hold with a medium to high shine factor, such as OSIS FlexWax (a good choice if you like to play around with your product). For best styling results use on dry hair for hold, texture and separation.

Pomade

Pomade

Depending on the brand, Pomade’s can be a cream base or a water base, with a medium to firm hold factor and a low to medium shine factor. *some lines offer high shine such as American Crew Pomade and AG Waxx High Shine Pomade. For best results, use on dry hair, for hold, separation and /or texture.

Hair Gel

Gels

Gel hair products have a watery consistency. Hair gels are available in all hold factors, from soft hold to extreme hold. Gels can be used on wet or dry hair and can be used to add volume and hold. Some Gels are alcohol free = less chance of flaking, such as KMS Hair Stay Styling Gel.

Hair Paste – a thicker, creamier consistency. Most Pastes will offer a high/strong hold factor with little to no shine, such as KMS HairPlay Molding Paste and Joico Flex Control Pliable Paste. Pastes can be used on wet or dry hair – depending on the style you are trying to achieve. Use on wet hair for slicked back styles, on dry hair for separated, pieced styles.

Hair Molding Clay

Hair molding clay is thick in consistency. Hair moulding clays offer a high hold and matte finish (no shine), such as Joico ICE Erratic and Sebastian Craft Clay. Clays can be used on wet or dry hair. The product should be emulsified well into your hands before applying to you hair. *if you like to play around with your style and product – a clay may not be your answer.

Conclusions

Matte equals no shine, but is pliable and easy to work with and apply. Waxes and Pomades with a high shine factor, use too much of the product and your hair will look greasy. Clays offer a great hold factor, they are not always the most pliable. Alcohol free products have less chance of flaking.

All products will list their hold factor/shine factor on the back of the packaging. All Salon Professional product lines have websites with great tutorials and styling tips for your new found short haired self. Happy styling Beauties!

Contributing author Sara Stancu is “That girl in the red coat”. Sara is also the manager of a salon and retail shop with over 20 years of customer service and sales experience. Her tell it like it is approach is aimed at educating and enlightening clients, stylists and salon owners. She has also been the woman locked in the bathroom hating her hair. You can follow Sara on her website That Girl in the red coat and Twitter.

 

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How to Find a Great Hair Colorist

The Fashionista’s Guide to Finding a Great Hair Colorist

To find a fabulous hair colorist, you need to take your time. Entrusting your hair color to just anyone for a complicated process can be risky. But if you start slow, you won’t feel guilty if you need to try out a few different hair colorists.

After all, owners would like to keep your business, and if one hair colorist doesn’t satisfy, there may be another in the next chair who’s better trained or who charges less, depending on your needs. To go down this tricky path, make it known you’re interested in trying out different hair colorists when you book an appointment. This way, you’re free to find the perfect hair color pro for you.

Hair Colorist

Getting Started

So, where do you look for a great hair colorist? Here are some suggestions:

  • Go Online ~~ Do a search for “best hair colorist,” “great hair colorist” or “hair color specialist.” Check the reviews on Yelp and CitySearch. Pay particular attention to write ups that talk about the kind of hair color you want—highlights, red, etc. Searching for “hair color educator” nets you someone who trains other hair colorists. Ask friends and relatives whose hair color you love, especially if it’s similar to what you want.
  • Do Your Homework ~~ Look in hair magazines for names of hair colorists whose work you like. If you know you need someone with special expertise, i.e., you’re a brunette who wants to go blonde, your hair is badly damaged or you’re interested in doubling up on chemical services, check out the Amencan Board Certified Colorists at haircolorist.com.
  • Be a Snoop ~~ Cruise the mail, peek in windows, hang out in a waiting room—all to check out the hair color coming out the door of the salon you’re considering.

A hairdresser having a conversation with client on a couch in hair styling salon

The Consultation

Once you have a name and number, book an appointment for a consultation. Bring photos and questions. In addition to talking about your own hair and asking for ideas, ask about their training, and how often the colorist takes advanced classes and workshops. Also, find out how he or she would retouch highlights and what shade will neutralize your brassy strands. Any pro worth her palette knows the color wheel and avoids bleach overlap.

Hair Colorist Consultation

 Your First Appointment

Start with something simple—color that is just a couple shades from your own, a few highlights or a root retouch. If you like what you’re getting, return to the colorist until you trust your hair in his or her hands. If it starts looking green, brassy or otherwise bad over time or you request a bigger change that doesn’t make you happy it’s tine to look some where else.

When you book your appointment, make it clear you’ve picked the salon because its convenient for you and you’d like to try different colorists. Follow through, if you’re not completely satisfied. Color chemistry is tricky and you can only find a truly great hair colorist by seeing how he or she adjusts your hair color over time. Your color pro should discuss maintenance, home care, budget, skin tone, eye color, seasonal changes and your hair health. If you need true color correction—for instance, if you’re starting with a home bleach job—one or two tries should tell you if you’ve found someone you can count on.

How to Find a Great Hair Colorist

As Time Goes By

Be honest, if you know you’ll want to occasionally color your hair at home to save money, let your colorist know and ask for advice. Or if cash is an issue, you could see the more expensive person for major changes; then, a junior colorist for retouches.

  • Build the Relationship ~~ If you’re paying for a pro, you should feel confident enough to ask for new ideas and your hair colorist should be providing them. If you’re always asked, “DO you want the same thing we did last time?” request ideas, If you don’t get them, consider moving on before you get stuck in a rut.
  • Send Referrals ~~ There is no better way to show your appreciation than to refer others to your colorist. Show off your new shades on your Facebook page, send out a tweet or simply tell friends the old-fashioned way—by word of mouth. Also, be sure to review your hair colorist online. Many salons reward both you and your friend when you make referrals, so don’t be shy about sharing. It’s nice to spread some good news for a change

hair colorist

How do you assure the hair colorist you choose is knowledgeable, competent or . . . qualified?

Any licensed barber or beautician can legally color your hair. Cosmetologists and Barbers are tested on basic aspects of hair coloring in board exams when they are first liscensed. But, I can tell you first hand, there is much more to learn in becoming an accomplished board certified hair colorist than just becoming licensed to use hair color on the public.

Additional education is needed to become a board certified hair colorist. Unfortunately, to the demise of the profession, some learn by trial and error, or strictly by experience. Has your hair colorist chosen to extend education in the profession of hair coloring?

If you have been unable to find a good hair colorist by referral, here is one way you can assure yourself the hair colorist you chose has reached a higher level of competency and knows this complex subject matter.

The American Board of Certified Hair Colorists, has created a program with a stringent test mechanism, created by a committee of fellow licensed hair colorists professionals. The test has been developed and refined over the years to establish in the profession, a greater level of ability.

Adjustments have been made to balance the degree of difficulty of the exam, as the first year, 50% of the students failed the examination. (Only licensed barbers and beauticians can take this course. That may tell you how much the average licensed professional, is lacking, in the way of hair coloring knowledge.)

Clearly, there are various levels of ability in hair colorists. There is always more to learn about this subject. A recognized “Board Certified Hair Colorist” is an easy way for the consumer to recognize a hair colorist that has achieved a higher level of capability in hair coloring. You can find board certified hair colorists listed in ads that run in hairstyle magazines. You can call 888-425-6578 or just go to their trade association website and follow the link for finding a hair colorist in your area.

I know there are good, competent, hair colorists out there who are NOT Board Certified and that have gone the extra mile to get the training necessary to be superior hair colorists. But, I talk to a lot of consumers who have problems finding competent people. This is just an excellent resource for the consumer to be able to select those hair colorists, in their area, that have clearly reached a greater level of excellence.

Barb Quinn on Google+  

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Hair Perm 101

Things to Think About Before You Get a Hair Perm

Want to change your hairdo? Aside from a mohawk, one of the most exciting ways to alter your look is with a “perm” or permanent wave. It can increase the fullness of soft, fine hair, put a curl or wave into straight hair, or simply make your hair easier to style

Growing up with a long, tangled mass of corkscrew curls, I would have done anything for the stick—straight styles so many of the other girls had. They, of course, coveted my curls. Why do we always want what we don’t have? Never mind, that is what salons are for.

hair perm

If you yearn to change your hair texture, try not to make it too drastic. The greater the difference. the more obvious it will be when it grows out, which puts you into the high—maintenance zone. Perming your hair is something that you should approach with caution and only after a good understanding of the downsides of how to perm hair. If you retexturize your hair, you’ll need to be diligent about touching up the roots and take more time to condition and care for it.

Perming relies on chemical processes to break the bonds in the hair’s structure and reestablish them in the shape of a curl (permed) or straight (relaxed), But if you’re already using blow—dryers, curling irons, hot rollers, and flat irons to retexturize your hair on a daily basis, you’re already damaging your hair. So you may as well get the look you want, avoid the daily wear and tear on your hair, and save yourself some time and trouble. Besides, there are new products and methods available (especially in the salon) that are not as harsh and damaging as they used to be.

Permanent Waves

Perms have come a long way since they were first developed in 1902, when quicksilver, nitric acid, and heat were used to wave the hair. The wet hair was wrapped in treated papers, dried and greased. The perm lasted for around three weeks.

Today, stylists can control not only which part of the hair they want to perm (such as a “root perm” to add body to fine, limp hair) but also the softness of the curl, Show your stylist a picture of the type of curl you want so she can choose the right—sized rods, Almost any type of hair can take a perm, but some hair types take more skill. If you are an Asian American woman with thick, heavy hair, for example, or an African American with fine hair, it may he hard, to get your hair to take the perm. You will need to find a stylist who is experienced enough with your kind of hair to know how to wrap it. When you’re creating an artificial curl, you have to work with the weight of the hair and see what the density of the hair will handle.

The stylist will apply one chemical solution to break the bonds in the hair and another, a neutralizer, to reform the bonds and change its texture. The tightness of the curl depends on the size of the rods used. If you want a tighter, curl, your hair will be rolled around smaller rods while it processes. For a softer, looser: curl, the rods are bigger, A perm lakes 48 hours to settle; you won’t have the full style impact until then.

  hair perm

Choosing the Right Hair Perm Product

There is no such thing as a chemical—free perm. (Don’t be misled by “botanical perms”, these contain added plant extracts, but they also contain chemicals!) Traditional perm solutions contain ammonia or the sulfur-based chemical thioghycolate. Not only do they smell bad, they can wreck your hair . The gentlest, top-quality perm solutions . . . Zotos Distinctly Different, Helene Curtis Insite, Senscience Inner Strength Waving Lock, Système Biolage Style Support Wave, can be found only in salons, which is where I recommend you perm your hair anyway. At-home treatments take longer to process, the technique is difficult to master, and misuse of the chemicals can result in frizzy, fried hair.

But if you want to do it yourself, look for ‘thio-free” solutions, which contain conditioner to soften hair, and don’t roll the hair too tightly, If you want a loose curl, forgo the curling rock altogether, divide the hair into sections, wrap each section around a piece of cloth, tie the ends together, and apply solution, For a really : subtle look, divide your hair into four or six even sections, twist the hair into Princess Leia buns, clip to the head, and apply solution.

hair perm

Prepping for a  Hair Perm

If you make sure your hair is healthy before you perm, you’ll avoid broken, brittle hair afterward. In the weeks before, use a protein conditioning treatment, as well as a moisturizing conditioner after you shampoo, But do not deep-condition your hair for at least 24 hours before the process . . . it may interfere with how well your perm takes hold. And do not shampoo for at least 48 hours afterward to give the process time to “set.”

After your perm, shampoo with ammonium, rather than sodium—based shampoos with keratin or wheat amino acids, which strengthen the hair fiber. Matrix Perm Fresh and Nexxus Rejuv-A-Pernm are a couple of good choices. Products with silicones and dimethicone make combing easier, Avoid polyquaternium or resin listed in the fìrst few ingredients because they weigh down the hair.

Once, anything other than a professional salon perm put you at risk of looking like someone fro the Walking Dead. But today, there are excellent, easy-to-control home perms for every type of hair. The key to success in home perms is choosing the right product for your hair.

Barb Quinn on Google+  

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Got a question, war story or comment about this topic? Click on the "Leave Your Comments" link at the very bottom of this article. Some of my best ideas for future articles come from reading reader comments. I'd love to hear from you!





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